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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 175 (some duplicates have been removed)
by your presence today. thank you for joining us, and thank you to your burma team for your leadership in strengthening u.s.-burma relations. my colleagues at the asian society are delighted to co-host today's event along with the united states institute of peace, and jim, thank you -- congratulations on your appointment as president of this association. i would love to say our relationship with aung san suu kyi goes back to the 1960's when she was living in new york city and working at the united nations. we are so glad that some many of our friends and supporters are here with us today to welcome her back to the united states. we have been organizing programming emphasizing regional issues as well as art exhibitions and cultural performances. since its founding in 1966 by john d. rockefeller iii. we have followed up a task force on improving u.s.-burma relations. let me conclude by saying we recognize this is a most important moment in burma's history and we are committed to continuing this work. the asia society and our partners in this effort stand ready to help. thank you. jim? [a
. thank you for joining us, and thank you to your burma team for your leadership in strengthening u.s.-burma relations. my colleagues at the asian society are delighted to co-host today's event along with the united states institute of peace, and jim, thank you -- congratulations on your appointment as president of this association. i would love to say our relationship with aung san suu kyi goes back to the 1960's when she was living in new york city and working at the united nations. we are so glad that some many of our friends and supporters are here with us today to welcome her back to the united states. we have been organizing programming emphasizing regional issues as well as art exhibitions and cultural performances. since its founding in 1966 by john d. rockefeller iii. we have followed up a task force it on improving u.s.-burma relations with a follow-up. let me conclude by saying we recognize this is a most important moment in burma's history and we are committed to continuing this work. the asia society and our partners in this effort stand ready to help. thank you. jim? [applause]
legislature, and the judiciary, and to judge the process of democrats is stationed in burma democratization in burma. have been divorced by democratic practices for many decades. in fact, many of them say they're frankly, we do not know what democracy is, but we do not want dictatorship. then they voted for us. we went around the country. i asked many of them why the wanted democracy. they usually it would say, we want to be able to lead our own lives freely. we want the freedom to be able to decide our own destinies. simple wish.very has become very poor under the years of military and dictator leadership. it dates to be built on policies and to help raise as out of -- needs to be built on policies that will help raise us out of poverty. u.s. sanctions had no affeffect. lately in a the last years of military rule, the u.s. sanctions were blamed for all of that economic illnesses of burma and other ills as well. there is great eagerness for the sanctions to be removed. on my part, i do not think we need to cling onto sanctions on necessarily. i want our people to be responsi
. i think this is when we had to start thinking very seriously about new u.s.-burma bilateral relations. burma had certainly started out on the process of democratization. but how far will it go? how sustainable is it? how genuine is it? those are the questions. i think these questions have not yet been answered in their entirety. how genuine is the process. how sustainable it is. it will depend on all of us. first of all it will depend on the people of burma. the people of burma as represented by those in the legislature would have a lot to do with it. we must also remember that the reform process was initiated by the president. i believe that he is keen on democratic reforms, but how the executive goes about implementing those reforms is what we have to watch. and when we think of democracy, we have to think of the three props of democracy. the three arms of democracy. executive, legislature, and the judiciary. we cannot judge how genuine or how sustainable the democratization of burma is simply by looking at the executive. neither can we do it by looking simply at the legis
of whom are with you here today, for your leadership in strengthening u.s.-burma relations. my colleagues are delighted to co-host this event along with the united states institute of peace. jim congratulations on your appointment of president of this great institution. we look forward to continuing our work together. i am pleased to say that the society's relationship with aung san suu kyi goes back to the late 1960's and early 1970's when she was living in new york city and working for the united nations. we are grateful for this long-standing friendship, and we are glad so many of her friends and supporters could join her today, to welcome her back to the united states. asian society has been organizing burma related public programming focused on human rights, health, political developments, and regional issues as well as art exhibitions and cultural performances. since its founding in 1956 by john d. rockefeller iii. in 2009 we established a task force devoted to improving burma-u.s. relations, which we have followed up with an emphasis on strengthening relations between our countries
sanctions against myanmar, also known as burma. this is one hour and 15 minutes. >> well, welcome to all of you. this is my first official of bent as the new president. what a thrill, frankly, to be here with you. her first visit to the united states in 20 years. no. a 40 years. and she chose to come to the institute for her first public address. we have wonderful partners in the society. and the blue moon a society. we have a great relationship with the state department of secretary clinton today. a number of her colleagues are here. kurt campbell. in addition, i would like to particularly recognize a couple of our board members. without her, i do not think this event would have occurred. i would like to thank her for coming. i like to turn things over. [applause] >> i join with jim. i want to tell you that this is an extremely large and important a pleasure that we have in welcoming all of you here today. it is an event in honor of remarkable individual. we welcome you and your delegation to washington. we have followed to your struggle over the last two decades and have been inspired
in a conversation recorded early friday morning. >> i think the members of the u.s. congress have burma's best interests at heart. and the reason why they instituted sanctions is because they believed that it would help burma to proceed to its democracy. and now that i think most of them understand it's time for sanctions to be lifted to give us an opportunity to stand on our own feet. i'm sure they will be happy to do it. >> rose: also this evening wynton marsalis and garth fagan. their new piece is called "lighthouse/lighting rod" >> so i received a tremendous education from god and down through the years our companies are like familiment we work together, we go to their shows, they come to ours. so after allf this time, we collaborate very easily because we have a sensibility and understanding. and we as musicians understand what his style is about. >> its music for me, i become a member winton accepted as a choreographer. i don't dance to the music, i dance with the music. and i play with his music to and from. and to my eye and my spirit, it's richer and more wonderful. and thank god crit
cultural exchanges and marshaling expertise in support of the transeducation under way in burma. let me conclude by saying we recognize this is a most important moment in burma's history and we are committed to continuing this work. our partners in this effort stand ready to help. thank you. [applause] >> i have to introduce somebody who has no need to be introduced, secretary clinton. [applause] >> it's wonderful to be back here at usip, especially for this extraordinary, auspicious occasion. i want to thank usip and congratulate jim marshall on becoming president. we look forward to working with you. and i want to thank the asia society and henrietta ford and all who represent the commitment that started in the 1950's but has certainly stood the test of time. and we very much enjoy working with you as well. now the purpose for this gathering is quite an exciting one. because we have here an opportunity for someone who has represented the struggle for freedom and democracy for human rights and opportunity, not only in her own country but seen as such around the world. so it's wonderful
house arrest because she was an outspoken and fight for democracy in burma the pro- democracy activist was in san francisco part of a u.s. visit that includes standing ovations in washington and that the united nations anne mackovic explains robert parents is important. >>> those of my generation know i've come to san francisco with flowers in my hair >>> and not simply as " the lady " she spoke in front of a packed house at usf >>> we must always have our eyes focused towards the future even as we deal with present and its difficulties and problems >>> in the first visit to the west since 1971 for the political prisoner turned parliamentarian she is a key figure in the transition to democracy in burma in what's known as me and mark >>> she spoke in burmese >>> she was trying to say don't forget your roots >>> many exiles are here >>> like a dream coming true we're witnessing the community coming together ever body is beautiful >>> she is my hero all of my life i am so proud to be burmese >>> somewhere somewhere she would do more to protect all minorities in burma >>> human rights for
years under house arrest in her fight for democracy in burma pro- democracy activist was in san francisco is part of a high- profile visit it that includes standing ovations in washington and the united nations. anne mackovic explains her appearance is important >>> those of my generation will know i've come to san francisco with flowers in my hair. >>> known simply as the lady nobel pripet peace prizewinner spoke in front of a packed house at usf >>> we must always have eyes focused toward the future even as we deal with present and its difficulties and problems >>> the first visit to the west since 1971 for the political prisoner turned parliamentarian she is a key figure in the transition to democracy in burma also known as me and mark. >>> today she spoke mainly in burmese >>> she was trying to say don't forget your roof and were you are from >>> many exiles are here as well >>> and a dream come true we are witnessing the fact the community comes together and everybody is beautiful >>> she is my hero all of my life i am so proud to the burmese >>> at the rally some say if th
with respect to the u.s. support for assistance provided by international financial institutions for burma and for other purposes. the speaker pro tempore: pursuant to the rule, the gentleman from california, mr. royce, and the gentlewoman from new york, mrs. maloney, each will control 20 minutes. the chair recognizes the gentleman from california. mr. royce: mr. speaker, i'm going to ask unanimous consent that all members have five legislative days to revise and extend their remarks and insert extraneous material into the record on this measure. the speaker pro tempore: without objection. mr. royce: i yield myself such time as i may consume, mr. speaker. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman is recognized. mr. royce: thank you. this afternoon, congress was finally able to present aun sun suu khyi the gold medal for freedom. i was an original co-sponsor of mr. crowley's legislation that set the stage for today's ceremony. of course that legislation passed years ago, back in 2008, when ms. khyi's house was her prison. 34 thought this day would never come. she was able to visit capitol hill
seriously about new u.s.-burma bilateral relations. burma had certainly started out on the process of democratization. but how far will it go? how sustainable is it? how genuine is it? those are the questions. i think these questions have not yet been answered in their entirety. how genuine is the process. how sustainable it is. it will depend on all of us. first of all it will depend on the people of burma. the people of burma as represented by those in the legislature would have a lot to do with it. we must also remember that the reform process was initiated by the president. i believe that he is keen on democratic reforms, but how the executive goes about implementing those reforms is what we have to watch. and when we think of democracy, we have to think of the three props of democracy. the three arms of democracy. executive, legislature, and the judiciary. we cannot judge how genuine or how sustainable the democratization of burma is simply by looking at the executive. neither can we do it by looking simply at the legislature. nor by looking at the judiciary. if you are to loo
. >> woodruff: then, congress awards burma's opposition leader its highest civilian honor. margaret warner examines the country's move toward democracy. >> ifill: students headed back to school in chicago today. ray suarez assesses the lessons learned from that city's teachers' strike and what it might mean for the nation. >> woodruff: we have two political stories. first, what the latest polls tell us about what's driving voters this fall. >> ifill: and a conversation with journalist bob woodward, whose new book offers an inside look at partisan bickering over last summer's debt limit deal. >> some of the negotiations, some of the proposals, were made impulsively by telephone. there is a monumental miscommunication here that sets the whole thing off. >> woodruff: that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour." major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: ♪ ♪ moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and
for democracy in burma activist on song so she spoke in san francisco included standing ovations in washington and the united nations anne mackovic explains why her appearance here is important >>> those of my generation will know i've come to san francisco in the right way with flowers and my hair. >>> known as " the lady " nobel peace prizewinner spoke in front of a packed house at usf. >>> we must always have our eyes clearly focused on the future even as we deal with present and its difficulties and problems. >>> in the first visit to the united states since 1971 for the political prisoner turned parliamentarian she is a key figure in the rise in democracy in burma. >>> today she spoke mainly in burmese >>> she was trying to say don't forget your root and were you come from >>> many exiles are here >>> a dream coming true we are witnessing and the communities coming together ever body is beautiful >>> my hero for all of my life, i am so proud to be burmese. >>> some rally in and say they wish so she would do more to protect minorities in burma >>> human rights for all >>> this is what i th
than 10% of the seats. all this came as myanmar, formerly called burma, moved toward greater openness under new president, thein sein, once a member of the old military junta. his government has lifted many press restrictions and released hundreds of political prisoners. but hundreds remain. and at a washington event yesterday, secretary of state hillary clinton said the u.s. wants to see even greater reforms. >> i think one of the important reasons for her visit at this time is to remind us of how much more still lies aheadfrom strengthening the rule of law and democratic institutions to addressing the challenges in many of the ethnic conflicts. >> warner: washington did restore full diplomatic relations with myanmar in january. and derek mitchell was named the first american ambassador there since 1990. the obama administration also has lifted some economic sanctions, allowing for american investment in myanmar. and, it is currently weighing lifting others, including the ban on imports from the southeast asian country. yesterday in washington, suu kyi urged a greater easing of u.s.
for the political prisoner turned parliamentarian she is a key figure in the transition to democracy in burma also known as myanmar. >>> today she spoke mainly in burmese >>> she was trying to say don't forget your root and were you come from >>> many exiles here as well >>> a dream come true and what is the community come together >>> my hero for all of my life, so i am so proud to be burmese. >>> some rallied and wished to cheat would do more to protect minorities in burma >>> we speak out for injustice >>> " this is what i think is most precious about this city you are open hearted and open- minded, when need both, closed mines and open hearts cannot do very good together >>> she goes to los angeles next after more private meetings in the bay area anne mackovic cbs 5 >>> a difficult lesson for bay area and psychiatrist at the losing his teenage son what he learns what his profession has done wrong. they survived carmageddon 1 now comes carmageddon 2, drivers,, vo: for years, sacramento politicians have chopped away funds for our schools. today, we're forty-seventh out of fifty in per-pupil fund
country. >> that was a spokesman to the u.n.'s refugee organization. burma's president will address the united nations. the speech comes as the united states announced it is lifting the ban on the import of goods from burma. the opposition party led by aung san suu kyi has welcomed the lifting of the ban. the united states relaxed its financial restrictions after the country held elections earlier this year. here is out the u.s. secretary of state hillary clinton justified the move. >> the united states is taking the next step in normalizing our commercial will relationship. we hope this will provide more opportunities for your people to sell their goods into our markets. >> our correspondent jonathan hefad has been talking to the speaker of the burmese parliament, one of the top generals and the old regime. she gets -- began by asking about the state of relations between the government and opposition parties. >> i have a good relationship with aung san suu kyi. what happened in the past is over. it is finished. i don't see any point in dwelling on it. because she also loves the cou
, but for many in myanmar, also known as burma, fear still lies just below the surface, and a critically acclaimed new documentary shows their fight for freedom son-in-law just beginning. >> they may be expecting to go to school, but they can't afford it, so this is their reality. >> schooling -- they put children to work. >> how old are you? >> 15. >> 15? >> yeah, 15. >> how old are you? >> 14. >> are you 14? are you 14? >> yeah. yeah, 14. >> this was shot secretly using just a handheld camera by the man who joins me right now, robert lieberman. good to see you. >> thanks for having me. >> so, mr. lieberman, you spent some time there teaching. what prompted you to say i need to start rolling some video here? >> well, i have been all over southeast asia, and i have always wanted to go into burma, and i had a chance to work with young filmmakers there, and i grabbed the opportunity. i was working in the state department. >> and what is it that you saw m images or the lifestyles of the people that you thought was remarkable and you knew it would take other viewers of this film aback as wel
if convicted today a nobel peace prize winner from burma will meet with a serious offense. she is said to speak at the university of san francisco and mind this morning >>> we will buy the right kind of investments, the kind of investments that would create jobs >>> she spent 15 years and our house arrest for her outspoken fight. cyclist celebrated the 20th of diversity of the group yesterday prayed every last friday of the month they would ditched their car for two wills and read through city streets. >>> and just ride the bike and have a good time >>> the monthly ride's have proven kind of controversial and dangerous. please have done little to hinder the movements over the years. >>> oracle's opening world will open off monday. it's expected to raise over $100 billion. cbs five with the potential delays on the road. let's go back to services go where once again we have oracle (world. we have a number of street closures in that area. our street issued down between third and fourth. this is causing pretty bad delays. it will continue until the middle of next week. we have not walked to end all
. elizabeth palmer, thank you very much. the leader of burma's democracy movement received the america's highest award, the congressional gold medal. she spent 15 years under how the srest in burma in southeast asia. in the past year, the military rulers there have made , mocratic reforms and she is a member of burma's parliament. deter the ceremony, she met privately with president obama. rt tw report today warns about arsenic in rice. who are the richest americans? we have the list. and california here it comes. tndeavour" heads out on its final mission when the cbs evening news continues. in. so, back to more pills. almost done, when... hang on. stan's doctor recommended aleve. it can keep pain away all day with fewer pills than tylenol. this is rudy. who switched to aleve. and two pills for a day free of pain. ♪ [ female announcer ] and try aleve for relief from tough headaches. tomato, obviously. haha. there's more than that though, there's a kick to it. wahlalalalallala! smooth, but crisp. it's kind of like drinking a food that's a drink, or a drink that's a food, woooooh! [ ma
in burma are apparently trying to learn democracy by watching old episodes of an american tv show. that's the word from the secretary of state hillary clinton. she spoke today at a ceremony to honor the burmese activist with the congressional gold medal, the highest civilian honor that congress can award. and secretary clinton recalled a conversation with a house speaker in burma in which he asked her to help lawmakers learn how to create a democratic process. >> he went on to tell me that they were trying to teach themselves by watching old segments of the west wing. [ laughter ] i said i think we can do better than that, mr. speaker. >> shepard: well, congress actually awarded that activist aung san suu kyi the congressional gold medal back in 2008 when she was under house arrest for fighting the nation's military rulers. the former first lady laura bush was among the speakers today. i said barbara, i meant laura. she said they hope that hope grows in burma and this is a tribute to this activist. new numbers out on the growing number of west nile virus infections. it is very serious i
fight for democracy in burma. now opposition leader and elected parliament member, she is on a diplomatic mission to the united states. linda yee was at an exclusive events where she just addressed bay area leaders in san fransisco? >> it was certainly a historic visit, her first to the bay area, the nobel peace laureate and member of parliament spoke of rapid changes in democracy in burma. but she also tells a cautionary tale of how a change has to come slowly. she says that her country is thrilled that the united states has eased some of the economic sanctions and a canal invite businesses to invest but she told an audience of business, civic, and political leaders, that the gold rush of investors have to benefit people, and beef offal. they have been an isolated country for 50 years when it was under a military dictatorship and people for the most part don't know what it is like to live in a democracy. >> we would like the right kind of investments, the kind of investments that will create jobs, and also provide young people with on-the-job training. for five decades
. she cautioned true progress in burma must include all people. >> it's not enough to help a country which is emerging from dictatorship into democracy. it has to be helped in such a way that the foundations of the democratic society would be strengthened. this, of course, means empowering the people. >> she spent 15 of the last 21 years under house arrest. but during her confinement, the world's continued to acknowledge her efforts to bring democracy to burma, also known as miyanmar n1991 she was award the the nobel peace prize. recently on september 19th she was presented the congressional gold medal, the highest civilian honor in the u.s. under the leadership of the current president, the country is slowly seeing political and social reform. john brandon is a member of the burma task force for the asia foundation. >> he was looking at what other parts of southeast asia and other parts of asia were doing and how they were progressing and the economic development and felt that his people were falling behind and this was something that was not sustainable. >> please help us but in th
cautioned true progress in burma must include all people. >> it's not enough to help a country which is emerging from dictatorship into democracy. it has to be helped in such a way that the foundations of the democratic society would be strengthened. this, of course, means empowering the people. >> she spent 15 of the last 21 years under house arrest. but during her confinement, the world's continued to acknowledge her efforts to bring democracy to burma, also known as miyanmar in 1991 she was award the the nobel peace prize. recently on september 19th she was presented the congressional gold medal, the highest civilian honor in the u.s. under the leadership of the current president, the country is slowly seeing political and social reform. john brandon is a member of the burma task force for the asia foundation. >> he was looking at what other parts of southeast asia and other parts of asia were doing and how they were progressing and the economic development and felt that his people were falling behind and this was something that was not sustainable. >> please help us but in the ri
to help support her country. she cautioned true progress in burma must include all people. >> it's not enough to help a country that is emerging from dictatorship to democracy. it has to be helped in such a way that foundations of a democratic society wlo be strengthened. this empowering the people. >> she spent 15 of the last 21 years under house arrest. during her confinement the world continued to acknowledge her efforts to bring democracy to burma. in 1991 she was awarded the noble peace prize. recently she was presented the congressional medal. under the leadership of the current president. country is slowly seeing social reform. john brandon is member of the burma task force for the asia foundation. he was looking for other parts of southeast asia were doing and how they were progressing and the economic development and felt his people were falling behind and something that was not sustainable. >> please help us, but in the right way. please help us thoughtfully. please help us but with proper sequencing and at the right speed. >> she will receive an honorary doctorate and
for the reformist government in burma to which aung san suu kyi paid a generous to beat. her american host new they were in the president of an icon. >> when her isolated had ended, we met her in person. we found not a symbol, but a woman. a woman of tremendous you are, honesty, grace. >> it is almost too delicious to believe, my friend, that you are here in the rotunda of our great capital, the centerpiece of our democracy, as an elected member of your apartment. >> they looked a emotional, she a little bit overwhelmed by comparisons to gandhi, king, mandela >> for every action there is a reaction and it is true in the world pharmaceuticals as well. an increase in genetically- modified crops in the u.s. has led to a rise in so-called super weeds. these plants are resistant to many herbicide which forces farmers to use up to 20 times the recommended dose of weed killer. >> the rise of resisted weeds on this farm near humboldt, nebraska has threatened the livelihood and family. last year, he spent $7.5000 on chemical sprays that failed to protect his crops. the pungent palling from these weeds
remembera. -- burma. she was awarded nobel peace prize and res recently presented the gregs kregsal gold medal. and under the leadership the country is seeing political and social reform. >> he was looking at what other parts of southeast asia were doing and how they're progressing and the economic development and this is something not sustain yoobl please help us in the right way, help us but... with proper sequencing as well as the right speed. >> and when asked what she suspects she said technology will have to play a major role in the process in burma. now, tomorrow she will receive an honorary doctorate from the university of san francisco and meet with members of the burmese community of the bay area. >> and there is christopher stevens will be honored before cal's football game. there is a degree in history stevens killed this month in that attack on the u.s. consulate in libya. this is now established it was, in fact a terrorist assault. >> we're going to show you scenes from a silent >>> this weekend a chance to watch history, maybe go back in time. >> this is pretty cool, actua
activists. she is most known for spending 15 years under house arrest in burma for opposing military rule. she was released two years ago. many in the audience today at usf were burmese residents who fled after the coup. the bay area is home to the nation's largest burmese community, and she is currently head of the main opposition group in parliament and pushing for a transition to democracy in burma. >>> richmond police are looking into two fights that allegedly solved a city councilman. 68-year-old corky buse was arrested after getting into a scuffle with an activist. he claims david moore hit him as he was walking away from an argument. the 72-year-old moore claims he was assaulted. the fight happened right in front of a police officer who cited both of them. last week the councilman was accused of another assault. investigators are not releasing details, though, of that incident. buse has a reputation for aggressive politics, and he is not running for reelection this year. >>> the vice presidential candidates took over the main campaigning today as the presidential candidates pe pair
and open-minded. >>> she is of course the political prisoner turned parliamentarian from burma and its first visit to the u.s. since 1971 in the bay area is home to about 85 and a burmese americans when of the largest committees of the country. >>> she's my hero for all of my life so i am so proud to be breeze. >>> one of the people that was there to rally outside the event 13 her to do more to protect all minorities in burma. she's headed next to los angeles. it was an amazing and then she's an amazing speaker and down to earth after everything she's been through. >>> now moving to los angeles before something is not going to see in a long time. the 4 05 with no traffic on the heaviest travel roadways in the state. >>> a live look what is normally a very busy freeway it's going on right now as they call it there is a construction crew going on right there with highway closed for the weekend so they can remove a bridge over crossing the report projects as a ton mile stretch of the for a five shut down until 5:00 tomorrow morning. a big turnout for a bay area tradition. still coming
nearby burma are the lifeblood of the thai shrimp industry. most thais wont work for the low wages paid by the shrimp producers. today as many as 400,000 burmese migrants work in samut sakhon, where 40% of thailand's shrimp are peeled and frozen for export. only 70,000 workers are legally registered. >> there are an estimated 1,200- 1,300 factories. 300-400 of which are not registered with the government. >> reporter: thai labor activist sampong sakaew says the most severe abuses occur in the network of unregistered, almost invisible, peeling sheds that supply shrimp to larger factories for export to the u.s. >> the small factory owners know that most of their workers are undocumented, so they can control the work force however they want; such as locking workers in until they finish their work. there are also teenagers between 12-17 years old in the work force. >> ( translated ): we were made to work from 3:00 a.m. until 9:00 p.m. we earned about $6 a day. our hands were like machines. >> reporter: like most migrants, ko ngwe htay was eager to leave burma, where jobs are scarce and sala
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 175 (some duplicates have been removed)

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